Protecting & Restoring Long Island's Peconic Bays

Protection Committee: Get Involved

Get involved and learn how you can play a role in promoting clean water and a healthy environment.

BECOME ENVIRONMENTALLY AWARE

Read about and observe the diversity of nature found within our waterbodies. Become familiar with environmental regulations of your area.

LEARN ABOUT THE LAND-WATER CONNECTION AND PREVENT POLLUTION

Learn about the land-water connection and how storm- and groundwater can carry waste from your community into the harbors and bays. Stormwater runoff is a major issue facing wa­terways throughout the country today. When precipitation from storms hits paved surfaces it flows towards the bays, picking up pollutants along the way. Decisions you make on landscaping, home management and waste disposal can impact water quality, fish habitat, recreational opportu­nities, and seafood safety. Identify and control sources of potential pollution including plastic waste.

SUPPORT HABITAT RESTORATION AND PROTECTION

The Peconic Estuary is home to some of the most valuable and rare habitats in the world. Un­fortunately, development pressure can negatively impact natural habitats and the diversity of life in the region. Pro­tect fragile coastal ecosystems and support habitat restoration in both public spaces and on your property. Maintain native vegetation, reduce lawn areas and plant with indigenous coastal plants where feasible to filter water pollution.

PROTECT EELGRASS MEADOWS AND WETLANDS

The value of eelgrass and wetlands is immeasurable, affect­ing all who live and recreate on Long Is­land. Eelgrass and wetlands are habitat and nursery ground for the majority of life in local waters, and without these ecosystems, finfish and shellfish populations are dramatically reduced. Eelgrass beds in particular have rapidly declined in the last few decades to 20% of previous acre­age. When boating, stay in marked channels, look out for eelgrass beds and avoid boating or anchoring in these fragile habitats. On shore, avoid trampling on wetland grasses and learn how water pollution and development can be mitigated to protect these valuable habitats. Learn more at www.SeaGrassLI.org.

REDUCE NUTRIENT DISCHARGES

As nutrients from fertilizers, septic tanks, pet waste and other sources make their way into local waterways they can cause al­gal blooms, which remove oxygen from the wa­ter, causing dangerous conditions for many fish and other organisms. Follow No Discharge Zone mandates, reduce or eliminate fertilizer use at home, and have your septic sys­tem regularly pumped out.

Search the calendars of our collaborators to learn more on regional water quality events.

Follow these links to educational resources on water quality. 

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